True Review
Current Issue Number 77 Vol.20  March 2011
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
NIGHTMARE AT 20,000 FEET

NIGHTMARE AT 20,000 FEET:

NIGHTMARE AT 20,000 FEET, by Richard Matheson. Gauntlet Press (www.gauntletpress.com), 2010, 271 pp., $50.00. ISBN 978-1-934267-21-9

NIGHTMARE is a nostalgic compendium of the classic short-story-turned-Twilight-Zone-TV-episode icon, not to mention part of the 1980s feature film. The compendium includes the original 1961 short story by Matheson and the changes the story underwent to be made into a TV and eventually a feature film script.

Also included is commentary by Rod Serling; Rod’s wife, Carol; Richard Donner and TV episode director; and William Shatner, who supplied the role of Bob Wilson, the “demented” passenger on the TV episode. Wilson, who insists there is danger on the plane’s wing, though nobody believes him, watches a gremlin trying to destroy the plane. Rounding out the commentary list are Tony Albarella and story editor/producer Rockne S. O’Bannon. Finally, the compendium includes the original TV series and feature film screenplays, story books from the film version, and plenty of photo galleries.

I enjoyed O’Bannon’s assessment. O’Bannon believes he really could not relate at all to the filmed episode, despite a memorable and harrowing performance by actor John Lithgow.

My own caveat about the filmed version: I expected ALLNEW episodes in the movie, not rehashes of what came before. Indeed, there are collections galore of potentially good Twilight Zone stories out there – I would do a three-part Twilight Zone movie with the following stories:

“The Beautiful, Uncut Hair of Graves”

“The Dead”

“The Persistence of Vision.”

I will send the galley I received of this book to the first person who identifies the author of each of these stories, where they FIRST appeared, and what they are about – just send an e-mail with your address!

Man, I love contests . . . .

Andrew M. Andrews

In This Issue

Soft Apocalpyse Nebula Awards Showcase 2011 Click on the Book Cover for Review Best Sci-Fi of the Year Oscar Wilde & Vampire Murders

Dawn to Dusk Brave New Worlds All Clear Zombie Autopsies Best of Kim Stanley Robinson

Nightmare at 20,000 Feet Griftopia Sleight of Hand Immaculate Deception Pump Six

Sympathy for the Devil Atlantis & Othe Places Darkness Holiday Nano Comes to Clifford

Game Changers Armageddon In Retrospect   The Fall of the House of Usher Realms of Fantasy

Next Time In True Review
FLAMING ZEPPELINS

FLAMING ZEPPELINS:

FLAMING ZEPPELINS: The Adventures of Ned the Seal, by Joe R. Lansdale. Tachyon Publications (www.tachyonpublications.com), 2010, 285 pp., $14.95. ISBN 978-1-61696-002-5

FLAMING ZEPPELINS is a combination of two short novels, ZEPPELINS WEST (Subterranean Press, 2001) and FLAMING LONDON (Subterranean, 2005). The love of westerns and pulp fiction, comic books and Texas weirdness, come into play. The best campy fiction in all of America? Probably.

Andrew M. Andrews
FLAMING ZEPPELINS

THE COLLECTED FANTASIES VOL. 5, THE LAST HIEROGLYPH:

THE COLLECTED FANTASIES VOL. 5, THE LAST HIEROGLYPH, by Clark Ashton Smith, ed. by Scott Connors and Ron Hilger. Night Shade Books (www.nightshadebooks.com), 2010, 370 pp., $39.99. ISBN 978-1-59780-032-7

THE COLLECTED FANTASIES is the last of five volumes to collect all of Smith’s tales. Included are works ranging from “The Dark Age” (April 1938) to “The Dart of Rasasfa” (July 1961).

Andrew M. Andrews