True Review
Current Issue Number 77 Vol.20  March 2011
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
NANO COMES TO CLIFFORDFALLS

NANO COMES TO CLIFFORDFALLS:

NANO COMES TO CLIFFORDFALLS And Other Stories, by Nancy Kress. Golden Gryphon Press (www.goldengryphon.com), 2008, 327 pp., $24.95. ISBN 1-930846-50-9

There are some memorable stories in NANO COMES TO CLIFFORD FALLS.

In the title story of this single-author collection, Carol, a divorced mother, and her neighbors in the community of CliffordFalls, are dealing with “nanomachines,” or technology that can replicate nearly everything. As a result, most jobs are obsolete. But society depends on the work of its citizens. How technology transforms the lives of people is what true SF is all about.

“Savior.” In 2007, a space “ship” or whatever it represents lands on the Minnesota-Canadian border. While scientists from all over the world desperately try to analyze and communicate with it, there is no response from inside the “craft” for decades. Many years later, the world suffers from an environmental catastrophe, the Collapse, rendering humanity unable to propagate. The Object could have been sent by anybody, any race, even from God, some believe – which is the way the survivors in the years since the Collapse treat it.

“First Flight.” Space Cadet Jared Ka Rhuda learns to obey, and then almost disobey, orders on his first flight at the SpaceAcademy – in a test he never expected. This story appeared in a Worldcon volume of stories from the 2006 event in Anaheim, Calif.

“To Cuddle Amy.” One of the few horror stories written by Kress, this one is also the shortest – only 900 words. The story narrates a future in which human life is truly dispensable.

“My Mother, Dancing.” In the next millennium, will humanity have finally discovered life on other planets? Or is this all we have?

Andrew M. Andrews

In This Issue

Soft Apocalpyse Nebula Awards Showcase 2011 Click on the Book Cover for Review Best Sci-Fi of the Year Oscar Wilde & Vampire Murders

Dawn to Dusk Brave New Worlds All Clear Zombie Autopsies Best of Kim Stanley Robinson

Nightmare at 20,000 Feet Griftopia Sleight of Hand Immaculate Deception Pump Six

Sympathy for the Devil Atlantis & Othe Places Darkness Holiday Nano Comes to Clifford

Game Changers Armageddon In Retrospect   The Fall of the House of Usher Realms of Fantasy

Next Time In True Review
FLAMING ZEPPELINS

FLAMING ZEPPELINS:

FLAMING ZEPPELINS: The Adventures of Ned the Seal, by Joe R. Lansdale. Tachyon Publications (www.tachyonpublications.com), 2010, 285 pp., $14.95. ISBN 978-1-61696-002-5

FLAMING ZEPPELINS is a combination of two short novels, ZEPPELINS WEST (Subterranean Press, 2001) and FLAMING LONDON (Subterranean, 2005). The love of westerns and pulp fiction, comic books and Texas weirdness, come into play. The best campy fiction in all of America? Probably.

Andrew M. Andrews
FLAMING ZEPPELINS

THE COLLECTED FANTASIES VOL. 5, THE LAST HIEROGLYPH:

THE COLLECTED FANTASIES VOL. 5, THE LAST HIEROGLYPH, by Clark Ashton Smith, ed. by Scott Connors and Ron Hilger. Night Shade Books (www.nightshadebooks.com), 2010, 370 pp., $39.99. ISBN 978-1-59780-032-7

THE COLLECTED FANTASIES is the last of five volumes to collect all of Smith’s tales. Included are works ranging from “The Dark Age” (April 1938) to “The Dart of Rasasfa” (July 1961).

Andrew M. Andrews